my world view

Jul 06

Up reading Ayaan Hirsi Ali’s Infidel… Seems rather simplistic when she is talking about her politics and her views on society. Her personal story, on the other hand is complex, brave, thought-provoking and heart-wrenching. I still haven’t made up my mind about the book and I’m done reading half of it

Jun 30

Our 30 days of Good.

We going to go on Good Magazine’s 30 days of Good starting July 7th.

These are the things we plan to do for the first seven days of the challenge

  1. Not miss a single day of eating breakfast and packing lunch from home
  2. Getting at least three days of exercise in the week
  3. Doing something outdoorsy (ride a bike in Governor’s island, central park)
  4. go on a picnic with a basket packed at home
  5. use my Alice Water and Mark Bittman book for some simple international cooking
  6. Eat rotis at least two nights a week
  7. Do something artsy (museum visit, gallery visit, catch a concert, paint a picture…)

Pictures and updates to follow….

Jun 17

(Source: thegirlwiththeskybison)

Jun 16

[video]

Jun 15

feministdisney:

my friend posted this to facebook- I imagine it’s probably been on tumblr before, but I thought it was cute and unexpected :)

feministdisney:

my friend posted this to facebook- I imagine it’s probably been on tumblr before, but I thought it was cute and unexpected :)

May 22

gautamramdurai:

Achievement Unlocked: Accidentally Photobombed Björk.
What was I supposed to do?? I COULDN’T SEE the damn screen coz of her hair!! Yes, that creepy man is me.
allisfullofbjork:

björk and a creepy man

gautamramdurai:

Achievement Unlocked: Accidentally Photobombed Björk.

What was I supposed to do?? I COULDN’T SEE the damn screen coz of her hair!! Yes, that creepy man is me.

allisfullofbjork:

björk and a creepy man

(via gautamramdurai)

May 15

gautamramdurai:

Made this.
And Blogged Self-transcendence on Tweetdeck and being an Internetist
What do you think?

gautamramdurai:

Made this.

And Blogged Self-transcendence on Tweetdeck and being an Internetist

What do you think?

(via gautamramdurai)

May 12

MOST AWESOME TV SHOW!!!

OK so The Legend Of Korra just went from being great to being super fantastic most awesome TV show yet. The heroine is spunky, headstrong, intelligent and can KICK ASS!! it’s awesome! Finally a great show with an awesome heroine!!!!!!!

Apr 19

Ethical Style: How to Kick the Fast Fashion Habit -


9 quick fixes to help you stock your closet with long-term clothes.

Apr 18

Blessed

This post was meant as a letter to a blog that I follow regularly but I also thought I could post it here as well

I have been reading a lot about being a feminist in India, about growing up as a girl in small town India as part of a close-knit middle class family. While I can relate to all of this, my own experience has been rather different. I too grew up in a small town, Mysore. We were strictly middle-class. My parents owned a house but we did not have a car, rarely ate out and were bought new clothes 3 times a year. I also got very little spending money. We were also a closely-knit extended family. However, my parents always forced me to get good grades. There was no question of me not being able to do something academically just because I was girl. My father expected me to be on top of my class with excellent marks in both maths and science. All through school I was a topper, considered part of the academic elite and was also expected to participate in debates, quizzes etc. My parents did not try to inculcate any of the expected seemingly “feminine” qualities”. I was taught to be not to be arrogant but nobody ever told me to be “humble”. No one ever told me to “adjust” because I was a girl. I did not learn to cook because I was a girl. (I learned to cook because I love eating). When I decided to get an MBA, there was no question of my parents not helping me to pay for it nor was there any question of me being close to home. The world had opened up for me and I could go anywhere I wanted.

When I was 21, I moved out because I got  job. Even as all my friends got married, there was no question of anyone even mentioning marriage to me. I still had so much to do and of course there would be no “searching” either. My parents made it pretty clear to me that they would accept anyone I wanted to marry, quite early in life (maybe when I was 18 or 19). There was no pressure from outsiders either. My mother is a forthright and opinionated woman and my father wanted his daughters to be independent and capable. My sister and I were both labelled as “different” and our relatives gracefully accepted and even loved us for what we were. I got married at the grand old age of 26 to a man I love. While all my friends are being pressured to have babies, no one even mentions babies to me. 

The reason I’m saying this is, a lot of people seem to be resigned to the fact that life pretty much sucks for the Indian woman/girl, especially after getting married. I think if we all just put our foot down once in a while and have the courage and conviction to do what we want, life can be easily lived on one’s own terms. My mother always told me and my sis that pleasing everyone shouldn’t be a priority if you want to be happy. She always says “one sala heli kettor agode better” (it’s always better to say what you want at once and be known as “bad”)

Too many women too many times want to please everyone around them. If only we said no loudly enough once in a while….